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New Animals
Horses and others
Red Pandas
My Egyptian Mau Cat Annie
Giant-Anteater
Otters
Keel-billed-Toucan
Egrets
Ducklings
Wild Birds
Dogs
Backyard and small birds
Cats
Cat hunting for a little rabbit
Insects
Other animals


Animals
New Animals
Horses and others
Red Pandas Red Pandas in Washington DC Zoo.
Red pandas exist in the shadow of giant pandas, but they were actually the first animals to be called "panda." In the past, red pandas have been classified with the bear family (which includes giant pandas) and with procyonids (a family that includes raccoons). Today, they are classified as the sole species in family Ailuridae.
Red pandas are engaging, bamboo-eating animals that resemble raccoons and share parts of their Asian habitats with giant pandas. Although not "giant," the red panda is an endangered species that also deserves scientific and conservation attention, as well as wider recognition among the public.
Red pandas have striking red coats and reddish-brown tear marks from the eyes to the corner of the mouth. They are especially vibrant during winter time: As their coats redden and thicken, they become easily visible on even the coldest January day
http://nationalzoo.si.edu/Animals/AsiaTrail/RedPanda/
My Egyptian Mau Cat Annie
Giant-Anteater
 Giant Anteater
Myrmecophaga tridactyla
Description
The largest of four anteater species, the giant anteater may be five to seven feet long, from nose to tail, and weigh 40 to 100 pounds. It has a narrow head, long nose, small eyes, and round ears, and a long, bushy tail, which can be two to three feet long. Its front feet have large claws, which are curled under when it walks. It has poor vision but a keen sense of smell.
Diet
The giant anteater detects termite mounds and anthills with its keen sense of smell and tears them open with its strong claws. What we call an anteater's nose is actually an elongated jaw with a small, black, moist nose, like a dog's nose. Giant anteaters have a two-foot-long tongue and huge salivary glands that produce copious amounts of sticky saliva when they feed. Termites, ants, and their eggs stick to the tongue as it flicks in and out and the insects are scraped off by the flexing of the lower jaw and swallowed. Anteaters have a very muscular stomach that grinds up the insects and powerful digestive juices to break down their prey. They may eat as many as 30,000 ants in a day. They will also eat ripe fruit if they find it on the ground.
Reproduction
After a gestation of about six months, a giant anteater will give birth to one offspring, which will be weaned in a few months. The young will ride on its mother's back for up to a year and remain with the mother for up to two years, or until she becomes pregnant.
Washington DC National Zoo, Read more and watch a video
 http://nationalzoo.si.edu/Animals/Amazonia/Anteater/Feb162011.cfm
Otters Washington DC Zoo
Keel-billed-Toucan

Here it is: the public and chat lover!
Visitors of The National Washington DC Zoo may think that this Big Nose calls himself Toucan.

However, this colorful guy just doesn’t like to be alone. So, he draws attention calling everybody around: “Toooucan….toooouuuucan… Hey Toucan! Don’t you see me?

Why don’t you chat with me?”


Washington DC National Zoo
Egrets
Ducklings
Wild Birds
Dogs
Backyard and small birds
Cats
Cat hunting for a little rabbit
Insects Insects
Other animals
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Welcome!New PicturesLandscapesStill LifeFlowers/ Plants, and GardensArtistic portraitCustom design projectsGreeting cardsAnimalsOSVAbout Photos of shows, my workshop ServicesContactold Archive